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03 August 2017 @ 09:24 pm
"do you not know I am a woman?"  
I haven't the faintest idea why, but this old article on the Cheek By Jowl As You Like It brought me very near to tears:

All you need is love: Adrian Lester and the miraculous all-male As You Like It by Declan Donnellan
https://www.theguardian.com/stage/2014/nov/12/all-male-as-you-like-it-cheek-by-jowl-declan-donnellan-adrian-lester

(…why doesn't Adrian Lester have a tag?)
 
 
 
sadcypress.dreamwidth.org on August 5th, 2017 01:16 am (UTC)
Ohhh, this is one of those productions I've always wanted to have a time machine to go see.
tempestsarekindtempestsarekind on August 8th, 2017 07:40 pm (UTC)
I know! Everyone who writes about it makes it sound so magical.
a_t_raina_t_rain on August 5th, 2017 01:34 am (UTC)
Apologies for commenting on something that has nothing to do with your actual post, but since you're the one person I know who is most likely to know the answer to this: exactly what sort of rhetorical device is "Better a witty fool than a foolish wit"? Chiasmus? Or has it got a more precise name?
tempestsarekind: cheveril glovetempestsarekind on August 8th, 2017 07:37 pm (UTC)
Sorry I didn't see this earlier; I haven't logged in for a couple of days! That is indeed chiasmus - which is sort of the catch-all label. One might consider that to be an example of antimetabole as well, since the roots of the swapped words are the same (you could swap concepts - if you said "I love and hate, despise where I adore," for example - and that would also be an example of chiasmus, even though the words aren't the same). But in general I default to "chiasmus" when the swapped words aren't exactly the same.